Monthly Archives: December 2012

Last Edition of Newsweek on Stands as Web Takes Over

With the web’s popularity increasing every year, print media has fought a long and hard struggle to stay alive. Sure, we will always have print media in our lives. There’s something special about holding a magazine or a book that people will never want to remove completely. But the days of print being everywhere are over.

We were reminded of that fact a few months ago when Newsweek announced it would go completely digital. The news magazine will no longer create a print issue and has instead embraced the web and attempted to function within it. The last print issue of Newsweek went on stands a few days before the New Year.

In recognition of its embrace of the internet, Newsweek has placed a #LASTPRINTISSUE on the cover in a well-made artistic and symbolic design. The hashtag symbol is an iconic web 2.0 image born out of Twitter and social media. It’s certainly a fitting way to recognize the transition from old to new media. The black and white background photo pays homage to days long gone thanks to the advance of technology, and it’s certainly a nice additional touch.

The ideologies and concepts behind the Web 2.0 movement that began over 10 years ago certainly have played a role in print’s slow demise. It’s hard for a print publication to match the interactivity, ease of use, and wealth of knowledge the internet has. People can create their own media and information much easier online than has ever been possible through print. The web simply attracts more people and is easier for consumers to, well, consume.

Newsweek had been printing issues for almost 80 years and eventually had to make the decision to switch to an internet-only business plan due to a slowdown in advertising sales, which many newspapers and magazines are facing these days.

Look for Newsweek Global to appear online in 2013. The company has embraced web tech and the magazine will be available in mobile, tablet, and PC format covering the entire global.

 

Web 2.0 Platforms Excel in 2012

2012 has been a great year for the concepts and ideas behind the Web 2.0 movement. What started out as a term coined in 1999 has spread all over the internet. People interact with Web 2.0 tech and design ideals every day now. It seems as if Web 2.0 has reached a pinnacle in its influence; much has happened in the last few years to propel the concept to the top of web design.

The social media explosion was a primary point of what people predicted for the web 2.0 movement. In 2012, Facebook reached over one billion users of its service. That’s a little over a seventh of the entire population of the planet!

In addition to Facebook, more and more people have adopted other social media and web 2.0 platforms in 2012. LinkedIn – the professional social network – reached over 175 million users this year. Twitter now has over 500 million users.

Twitter especially has become an important part of human communication. The service played an important role in some of the biggest events of 2012. People followed the NASA Curiosity Rover’s Twitter account religiously on its descent to Mars and afterwards. The election was huge news on Twitter and a vital tool for both candidates.

Twitter and other social media helped rescue workers and thousands of people struck by tropical storm Sandy a few months ago. Twitter still remains one service that can provide immediate information about what’s going on in the world.

This is just one small segment of the influence that Web 2.0 concepts now hold over the internet and its users. We’re communicating, posting, and sharing more than people ever have in all of human history. There’s no telling how much this will increase once 2013 comes. Look to see social media, interactivity, and user-generated content to continue to drive the best of the web.

Garmin Drives Into Web 2.0 with New App

When you think of Garmin, you think of a working – but boring – GPS system for getting you where you need to go. Simple, right? Yes, it is pretty simple. We never thought that we’d be seeing Garmin embrace the concepts behind Web 2.0, but that’s exactly what they’ve done with a new app recently released this week.

FastCompany reports that a new app from Garmin called The Navigon GPS “is getting integration with Foursquare today, alongside a new link to location sharing service Glympse.” Now that’s a navigation app that perks our interest!

Driving just launched into the Web 2.0 sphere with this new app. Now you’ll be linked up to social media for your drives around the country. Integration will help people explore new areas close to where they are located. You can in-turn share that information with your social media circles.

Data is the fuel behind Web 2.0 concepts like user generated content and information, social media, and a more interactive relation with the web. Garmin has found a genius way to integrate all of the data flying around into a navigation app to help their customers get where they need to go.

The app can even be linked in to your contacts and can inform them when you are close to your destination by SMS. Other users will even be able to track the progress of someone taking a trip with a simple link sent out at the beginning by the driver. Talk about integration.

Even though Web 2.0 concepts are getting a little old at this point (the term was first used in 1999!) it’s still fascinating to see how the main concepts are still being integrated into technology that we love and used today. The Navigon GPS app is just another example proving that participation, usability, joy of use, and social software can still work its way into many technologies where it is lacking. All it takes is some thoughtful brainstorming and smart design.

Garmin Drives Into Web 2.0 with New App
When you think of Garmin, you think of a working – but boring – GPS system for getting you where youneed to go. Simple, right? Yes, it is pretty simple. We never thought that we’d be seeing Garmin embracethe concepts behind Web 2.0, but that’s exactly what they’ve done with a new app recently released thisweek.
FastCompany reports that a new app from Garmin called The Navigon GPS “is getting integration withFoursquare today, alongside a new link to location sharing service Glympse.” Now that’s a navigation appthat perks our interest!
Driving just launched into the Web 2.0 sphere with this new app. Now you’ll be linked up to social mediafor your drives around the country. Integration will help people explore new areas close to where they arelocated. You can in-turn share that information with your social media circles.
Data is the fuel behind Web 2.0 concepts like user generated content and information, social media, and amore interactive relation with the web. Garmin has found a genius way to integrate all of the data flyingaround into a navigation app to help their customers get where they need to go.
The app can even be linked in to your contacts and can inform them when you are close to yourdestination by SMS. Other users will even be able to track the progress of someone taking a trip with asimple link sent out at the beginning by the driver. Talk about integration.
Even though Web 2.0 concepts are getting a little old at this point (the term was first used in 1999!) it’sstill fascinating to see how the main concepts are still being integrated into technology that we love andused today. The Navigon GPS app is just another example proving that participation, usability, joy of use,and social software can still work its way into many technologies where it is lacking. All it takes is somethoughtful brainstorming and smart design.

Web 2.0 Success Still Mixed

There were a few weeks in 2012 where many pundits were claiming that the big Web 2.0 companies were doomed to failure. These pundits had a lot of information available at the time that did show some pretty poor performance from Web 2.0 companies that had gone public. GroupOn, Facebook, Zynga, LinkedIn, and many others had their fair share of trouble on Wall Street and in their profits.

There have been some mixed results since then. Facebook saw a terrible IPO followed by a lack of any improvements for months. The largest Web 2.0 platform has since implemented numerous changes in their business and advertising model that have increased revenues and impressed shareholders. Their future looks promising.

Some companies that came out of the Web 2.0 era have not fared so well. Currently, one of the companies which took advantage of the massive amounts of sharing and data that Web 2.0 helped usher in, Pandora, has been under a lot of trouble lately. In a story in Forbes, Eric Savitz tells us that Pandora will not meet its projected revenues or profits per share. Like Facebook, Pandora is struggling along around $8 per share – half of its original IPO in June of last year.

While this isn’t necessarily a sign that Pandora is going to go the way of many other Web 2.0 start ups that couldn’t quite make it, it is a reminder that not all Web 2.0 ventures have gone well. Those that have succeeded have survived the rocky start that any new movement would be expected to have as it transitioned into a more profit based model. Facebook is a prime example of this and its future is currently looking fairly good.

Pandora doesn’t have nearly the number of users that Facebook has, but it provides a user-based service in music streaming that many enjoy. It won’t likely fail, but it definitely needs to make some adjustments like Facebook has to succeed.

Social Media Grows Up

One of the most important driving factors behind the Web 2.0 movement has been social media. Platforms like Twitter, Google+, and Facebook have been linking people closer and closer together. Communication has never been easier. The entire idea of something going “viral” comes out of the connections we have made in our social networks because of social media.

As the Web 2.0 movement started to come into being, there were critics of social media. Many thought it was just a passing fad or would never stick around as a mainstream platform that anyone and everyone could and would use. It was something cute and small and wouldn’t catch on. But recent data about social media use has shown that it’s all grown up now and here to stay.

Rachel King has a great piece about the growth of social media for ZDNet. She writes that the most important aspect of a new Nielsen and NM Incite Social Media report is the fact that “American consumers continue to spend more time on social networks than on any other category of sites.” In other words, social media is the primary purpose behind web browsing for Americans.

Ten years ago this was certainly not the case. But now that we know Americans are increasingly turning to the web for social media, this just further reinforces the fact that the predictions about Web 2.0 were true. The web truly is a collaborative, social, communal, and user-generated space. It’s still developing in that way too, and there aren’t many signs it’s going to deviate from that path in the near future.

Interestingly enough, there are an increasing number of people who access the web (and social media) from mobile devices. Over 150 million people in the US still use PCs to access Facebook for example. Over 75 million use Facebook apps from mobile devices and over 70 million use mobile browsers to visit the site. Those numbers have been increasing each year.

It will be interesting to see how the concepts behind Web 2.0 make the shift to mobile. It looks like people in the US and around the world will be accessing the web and social media more and more from mobile devices.