Monthly Archives: August 2013

A Look at Web 2.0 Usage in the Office

A lot has been written about the influence that Web 2.0 companies and ideas have had on popular culture and society in general. Even though many businesses were a little slow to hop on the Web 2.0 ride, ample time has passed for a lot of discussion on web 2.0 tech in the workplace.

As much as people enjoy having access to social media and sharing private information (including photos, opinions, and all sorts of other info) there are some aspects of Web 2.0 ideas that simply don’t belong or are harmful in a business environment.

A recent article by Michael Brownlee discusses this very topic on Vail Daily. One of the basic premises of the web 2.0 movement is the fact that users rely on user-generated content to communicate, share, and create a variety of interactions online. Wikipedia, Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Pinterest, and sites like those are fine examples of this. The users create the content.

But as Michael reminds us, these gems of the Web 2.0 era can definitely get you fired from your job.

As unfortunate as that may sound, it’s true. Employees have been fired for breaking rules in their contracts, for blogging about experiences they’ve had on the job, and for a variety of other reasons. Some of these people have been fired without ever posting clearly identifiable information about who they are or who their employer is.

So as social media and other web 2.0 sites continue to have more and more of an influence in our lives, web denizens have to be careful with what they share in regards to their professional lives. In some cases, even private information has gotten employees in trouble with their employers.

Perhaps in the future social media and other user-generated sites will be able to keep employers from seeing the content people post, but even if that does happen, it’s still many years away. Until then be careful with what you post on the web.

Is There a Web 3.0 Coming for Ecommerce?

Believe it or not, the idea of Web 2.0 has been around for over a decade. Much of what was predicted by the initial people who supported Web 2.0 has come to fruition. The web is far, far different from its initial growing period during the late 1990s. Now we have a much more connected web that relies on users for a great deal of its content.

The explosion in use of social media has been one of the most important concepts to come out of the Web 2.0 movement. This factor has changed the way people communicate and it is changing the way companies do business online. But there is talk in the business world by some writers online about Web 3.0.

According to a recent article written by Hassan Bawab, marketers and businesses are no longer playing catch up to the changes in how people interact and do business online. Now they are taking an active role in developing how the web will be used to grow business and communication.

Hassan writes that the purpose of Web 3.0 is “to capitalize on the expansive social web network through new and enhanced methods of interpreting internet user’s habits.” Basically he sees the Web 3.0 movement as businesses and marketers using big data and social platforms that came out of Web 2.0 to create a very effective method for reaching consumers and selling products.

Web 3.0 is about taking all of this information we have on our hands thanks to the Web 2.0 revolution, and combining it with the needs of businesses and the needs of consumers. It looks like it could be a great relationship but of course, one issue will have to be balanced very well: privacy.

Privacy concerns could be what slows down a true development of Web 3.0, especially with all of the latest privacy issues concerning the US government and the NSA. Consumers and businesses have to find a balance between convenience and personal privacy for Web 3.0 to work well.

A Look at Web 2.0 Usage in the Office

A lot has been written about the influence that Web 2.0 companies and ideas have had on popular culture and society in general. Even though many businesses were a little slow to hop on the Web 2.0 ride, ample time has passed for a lot of discussion on web 2.0 tech in the workplace.

As much as people enjoy having access to social media and sharing private information (including photos, opinions, and all sorts of other info) there are some aspects of Web 2.0 ideas that simply don’t belong or are harmful in a business environment.

A recent article by Michael Brownlee discusses this very topic on Vail Daily. One of the basic premises of the web 2.0 movement is the fact that users rely on user-generated content to communicate, share, and create a variety of interactions online. Wikipedia, Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Pinterest, and sites like those are fine examples of this. The users create the content.

But as Michael reminds us, these gems of the Web 2.0 era can definitely get you fired from your job.

As unfortunate as that may sound, it’s true. Employees have been fired for breaking rules in their contracts, for blogging about experiences they’ve had on the job, and for a variety of other reasons. Some of these people have been fired without ever posting clearly identifiable information about who they are or who their employer is.

So as social media and other web 2.0 sites continue to have more and more of an influence in our lives, web denizens have to be careful with what they share in regards to their professional lives. In some cases, even private information has gotten employees in trouble with their employers.

Perhaps in the future social media and other user-generated sites will be able to keep employers from seeing the content people post, but even if that does happen, it’s still many years away. Until then be careful with what you post on the web.

Chipotle Uses Social Media in an Interesting Way: They Faked a Hacking Attack

Everyone knows how important social media has been to the web 2.0 movement. It has helped web denizens to gain control of the web and keep it open and user-based. Can you imagine the internet without Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or any other social media platform? These companies changed how people use the internet forever.

Of course, it didn’t take long for businesses to hop on board the web 2.0 and social media craze. These days, businesses large and small use social media to bring in new customers, interact with current ones, and to build their brands and reach very effectively. It’s a win-win situation for users, businesses, and customers.

However, having success on social media like Twitter is all about generating buzz about your account. Since the web is all about users sharing information and the holy grail of exposure is when content goes viral, companies are always primarily looking at how to generate this buzz.

Chipotle is the latest (but not the first) to do something semi-controversial in regards to how they generate their own social media buzz. This time they faked that their Twitter account was hacked. In the past, Twitter accounts getting hacked has generated a lot of internet activity, usually because the tweets become hilarious or strange and people want to share them.

A real (or fake) hacking attack breaks up the monotony that can befall many companies using web 2.0 technology. While Chipotle isn’t the first company to fake a hacking attack on their Twitter account (MTV did it earlier this year), they are certainly the latest company.

The interesting part of all of this is the fact that thanks to how fast content and information is absorbed on the internet these days, there’s almost no negative recourse for Chipotle’s actions. They were able to generate buzz, get more followers, and get a lot of press exposure. By now, about a week later, people on the web have moved on.

Who would have thought that businesses would be using some of the most important web 2.0 tech to fake hacking attempts in order to generate business back when the concept of web 2.0 was announced to the world?