Garmin Drives Into Web 2.0 with New App

When you think of Garmin, you think of a working – but boring – GPS system for getting you where you need to go. Simple, right? Yes, it is pretty simple. We never thought that we’d be seeing Garmin embrace the concepts behind Web 2.0, but that’s exactly what they’ve done with a new app recently released this week.

FastCompany reports that a new app from Garmin called The Navigon GPS “is getting integration with Foursquare today, alongside a new link to location sharing service Glympse.” Now that’s a navigation app that perks our interest!

Driving just launched into the Web 2.0 sphere with this new app. Now you’ll be linked up to social media for your drives around the country. Integration will help people explore new areas close to where they are located. You can in-turn share that information with your social media circles.

Data is the fuel behind Web 2.0 concepts like user generated content and information, social media, and a more interactive relation with the web. Garmin has found a genius way to integrate all of the data flying around into a navigation app to help their customers get where they need to go.

The app can even be linked in to your contacts and can inform them when you are close to your destination by SMS. Other users will even be able to track the progress of someone taking a trip with a simple link sent out at the beginning by the driver. Talk about integration.

Even though Web 2.0 concepts are getting a little old at this point (the term was first used in 1999!) it’s still fascinating to see how the main concepts are still being integrated into technology that we love and used today. The Navigon GPS app is just another example proving that participation, usability, joy of use, and social software can still work its way into many technologies where it is lacking. All it takes is some thoughtful brainstorming and smart design.

Garmin Drives Into Web 2.0 with New App
When you think of Garmin, you think of a working – but boring – GPS system for getting you where youneed to go. Simple, right? Yes, it is pretty simple. We never thought that we’d be seeing Garmin embracethe concepts behind Web 2.0, but that’s exactly what they’ve done with a new app recently released thisweek.
FastCompany reports that a new app from Garmin called The Navigon GPS “is getting integration withFoursquare today, alongside a new link to location sharing service Glympse.” Now that’s a navigation appthat perks our interest!
Driving just launched into the Web 2.0 sphere with this new app. Now you’ll be linked up to social mediafor your drives around the country. Integration will help people explore new areas close to where they arelocated. You can in-turn share that information with your social media circles.
Data is the fuel behind Web 2.0 concepts like user generated content and information, social media, and amore interactive relation with the web. Garmin has found a genius way to integrate all of the data flyingaround into a navigation app to help their customers get where they need to go.
The app can even be linked in to your contacts and can inform them when you are close to yourdestination by SMS. Other users will even be able to track the progress of someone taking a trip with asimple link sent out at the beginning by the driver. Talk about integration.
Even though Web 2.0 concepts are getting a little old at this point (the term was first used in 1999!) it’sstill fascinating to see how the main concepts are still being integrated into technology that we love andused today. The Navigon GPS app is just another example proving that participation, usability, joy of use,and social software can still work its way into many technologies where it is lacking. All it takes is somethoughtful brainstorming and smart design.

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